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Wed Jan 30, 2008

Ten Spider Tech Breaks Orbit

I am pleased to announce that Ten Spider Technology & Science has been split from the Ten Spider Enterprises website to acquire independent status. This separation, completed on 8 January 2008, will allow for greater focus and name recognition. Ten Spider Tech will remain an integral part of the Ten Spider Enterprises family of websites.

Ten Spider Technology & Science provides a comprehensive and up-to-date collection of science and emerging technology information and resources to aid in personal, entrepreneurial and business endeavors. It is third in a series of websites to be spun off from the main Ten Spider Enterprises site.

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Posted by: The Spidermaster on Jan 30, 08 | 8:00 pm | Profile

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Sun Jan 20, 2008

Ten Spider Pets Is Now a Breed Apart

I am pleased to announce that Ten Spider Pets & Companion Animals has been split from the Ten Spider Enterprises website into its own independent site. This separation, completed on 30 December 2007, will allow for greater focus and name recognition. Ten Spider Pets will remain an integral part of the Ten Spider Enterprises family of websites.

Ten Spider Pets & Companion Animals is dedicated to fostering pet adoption and providing pet friendly information and resources for pet and animal lovers everywhere.

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Posted by: The Spidermaster on Jan 20, 08 | 10:30 pm | Profile

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Thu Jul 12, 2007

Super Typhoon Man-yi Updates

Since the passing of Super Cyclonic Storm Gonu in the Arabian Sea in June 2007, I have had no time to post to the blog. While I apologize for my silence, I have been very busy reformatting and expanding the Tropical Cyclone, Typhoon & Hurricane Tracking Center to provide improved storm coverage. Since the Center rather than the blog serves as the primary source for tropical cyclone information on this site, the blog has noticeably suffered.

Now we have Super Typhoon Man-yi, which was also designated as Typhoon Bebeng when it entered the Philippine area of responsibility. This storm has just been upgraded to super typhoon status in JTWC Warning 022 issued at 2100 UTC and is about to wallop Okinawa in the Western North Pacific with a potentially devastating blow. Man-yi is the first super typhoon of the 2007 season. I have included a link to the Okinawa Weather Radar (on which the eye is already clearly visible), and will add a link to the Japan radar loop as Man-yi approaches southern Japan. These links will remain in place following the storm's passage.


Super Typhoon MAN-YI
Super Typhoon MAN-YI, Infrared Image at 1856 UTC 12 July 2007, as it approaches
Okinawa (obscured by the cloud shield). Taiwan and the coast of China are to the left
with the northern Philippines at the lower left.
Photo courtesy Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (FNMOC)



For those of you not familiar with our Tropical Cyclone, Typhoon & Hurricane Tracking Center, it comprises near real-time satellite photos and tropical cyclone tracking plots, real-time weather radar images or loops where available, and links to other tropical cyclone resources worldwide. I have recently included the synoptic surface analysis for the tropical North Atlantic as well as regional satellite coverage for the Western Pacific Ocean. I will be adding regional satellite for the Indian Ocean very soon.

I have also begun creation of a tropical cyclone archive for storms we have covered. The archive will be built slowly as time permits. I invite anyone who has taken photos during a tropical cyclone or its aftermath, or who has a storm story to tell, to contribute to the archive.

Keeping up with the constant stream of new data when tropical cyclones are active can be challenging, especially when these storms are occurring on the opposite side of the World, as is frequently the case. Over the last two nights I have retired late and have awakened at 2 AM and 3:30 AM, respectively, averaging about four hours sleep per night. This is necessary in order to provide visitors in the danger zone with the most current information available collected at one central location. Despite the fact that I am "dog tired," I relish the task because I know there are those of you out there who benefit from my efforts.

I recently created a lens on Squidoo (my first) to publicize the Tropical Cyclone, Typhoon & Hurricane Tracking Center. If you visit the Center and like what you see, please go to our Squidoo lens and cast your vote to help boost our popularity.

Anyway, I have to get back to updating the storm. I wish you all the best and hope that those in the path of Man-yi are able to "weather" the storm OK.

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Posted by: The Spidermaster on Jul 12, 07 | 5:20 pm | Profile

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Thu Jun 07, 2007

Gonu a Goner

See Tropical Storm, Typhoon & Hurricane Tracking for the latest satellite images and tracking plots for tropical cyclones worldwide.

The remnants of what was once Super Cyclonic Storm Gonu are unceremoniously drifting onshore over southeastern Iran today, bringing heavy rain, blustery conditions and some flooding to the Makran Coast.

This once mighty storm is now all but dead, spinning itself out slowly over land. Both the JTWC and RSMC New Delhi have ceased issuing warnings on the storm. JTWC continues to monitor its progress, with latest estimates (at 1200 UTC 7 June 2007) showing central pressure of 1000 millibars (hPa) and maximum 1-minute sustained wind speed of 30 knots (56 km/hr).

At its height, Super Cyclonic Storm Gonu was upgraded by RSMC New Delhi at 1700 UTC on 4 June 2007 (based on 1500 UTC data) to the maximum classification a North Indian Ocean tropical cyclone can achieve. Gonu maintained central pressure of 920 hPa and maximum sustained 10-minute surface wind speed of 130 knots (241 km/hr) with gusts to 160 knots (296 km/hr) for six hours.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) at 1200 UTC on 4 June 2007 in Warning 010 indicated central pressure of Tropical Cyclone 02A (Gonu) at 898 millibars (hPa) and estimated maximum sustained 1-minute wind speed at 140 knots (259 km/hr) with gusts to 170 knots (315 km/hr), making it a Saffir-Simpson Category 5 storm (the highest rating on the Saffir-Simpson scale). This storm strength was maintained for six hours.


Super Cyclonic Storm GONU
Super Cyclonic Storm GONU, Infrared Image at 1800 UTC 4 June 2007,
on its approach toward Oman. The Arabian Peninsula is to the left in the photo.
Photo courtesy Naval Research Lab (NRL)



Thousands of residents were evacuated in the North of Oman followed by many hundreds on the Makran Coast of Iran as Gonu, downgraded to a very severe cyclonic storm, brushed the northeastern Oman coastline and churned into the Gulf of Oman. There, over cooler water and under the influence of increased upper-level wind shear, it slowly lost intensity but continued to produce high winds and torrential rains.

Widespread flooding has been experienced in the North of Oman, with wadis (dry stream beds) overflowing their banks. The streets of Muscat, the capital city lying on the north coast, were turned into rivers with cars stacked atop one another like cordwood. At least 12 people are confirmed dead in Oman, with the death toll expected to rise, but early warning and evacuations by civil defense authorities have probably spared many lives. Saeed al-Nahdy of the Associated Press called Gonu, "the strongest cyclone to threaten the Arabian Peninsula since record-keeping started in 1945." (Source: 6 June 2007 AP article) Oil and gas exports from the region have been halted for at least two days as a result of the storm, creating a concern that supply disruptions could inflate prices.

While storms such as Gonu are widely looked upon solely as being destructive, an essential benefit to Oman is their ability to recharge fresh water aquifers from which residents of the country obtain much of their drinking water.

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Posted by: The Spidermaster on Jun 07, 07 | 12:30 pm | Profile

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Wed Jun 06, 2007

Very Severe Cyclonic Storm Gonu Nears Central Gulf of Oman

See Tropical Storm, Typhoon & Hurricane Tracking for the latest satellite images and tracking plots for Very Severe Cyclonic Storm Gonu.

I have seen no news reports relating to the situation in Ra's al-Hadd, Oman (a small coastal town at the conjunction of the Gulf of Oman and the Arabian Sea, discussed in yesterday's post), following its close brush with Very Severe Cyclonic Storm Gonu. I have learned that this fishing community is the primary nesting site for green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) in Oman. Their nesting season coincides with the summer monsoon season in Oman, which peaks in July. We can only hope that their nesting cycle and nesting sites haven't been severely disrupted by Gonu.

Also as discussed yesterday, the track of Very Severe Cyclonic Storm Gonu did, in fact, take a jog to the north, but not at the time during which I felt I had observed such a course change. According to the latest JTWC ATCF track (Warning 018 issued at 1500 UTC 6 June 2007), this change in direction did not occur until the storm was north of the midpoint between Ra's al-Hadd and Muscat. This was a significant deviation from the JTWC forecast trajectory in effect at the time. While RSMC New Delhi was forecasting Gonu to move northward at the time, they claim that the center of the storm actually moved inland over the North of Oman -- an observation not supported by JTWC and which I myself strongly dispute based upon my own observations of the visible satellite imagery.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center has indicated that at 1200 UTC on 6 June 2007 (Warning 018) central pressure of Tropical Cyclone 02A (Gonu) was 972 millibars (hPa) with estimated maximum sustained 1-minute wind speed of 70 knots (130 km/hr) with gusts to 85 knots (157 km/hr), making it a Saffir-Simpson Category 1 storm. RSMC New Delhi at 1200 UTC (Advisory 34) still classifies Gonu as a very severe cyclonic storm with central pressure of 970 hPa, maximum sustained surface wind speed of 90 knots (167 km/hr) and wind gusts of up to 100 knots (185 km/hr).

JTWC expects Gonu to resume a more northwesterly track, continue to diminish in intensity and make landfall on the southern Iran coastline near the port city of Ra's al-Kuh within the next 24 to 36 hours.

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Posted by: The Spidermaster on Jun 06, 07 | 12:45 pm | Profile

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Tue Jun 05, 2007

Gonu Lashes Al Hadd, Oman, With Muscat in the Crosshairs

Ra's al-Hadd, Oman, a small coastal town at the conjunction of the Gulf of Oman and the Arabian Sea, is currently experiencing nearly the full force of Very Severe Cyclonic Storm Gonu as the storm appeared headed directly for that location. Situated very close to the easternmost point of the Arabian Peninsula with an elevation of only five (5) meters, this town could very well be devastated by Gonu, which is supporting wind gusts of 90 knots (RSMC New Delhi estimate) to 110 knots (JTWC estimate) (167 to 204 km/hr) and wave heights of up to 32 feet or 10 meters (JTWC), which I am guessing would translate into a storm surge of about 18 to 20 feet (about six meters). Hopefully, the residents have evacuated down the coast to the larger city of Al Ashkharah, which has a slightly higher elevation and a modern breakwater but, more importantly, will be experiencing offshore winds, which should greatly reduce or eliminate the threat of storm surge.

(NOTE:  I have never lived in nor visited this region, and obtain my information from internet sources felt to be reliable. If anyone native to the region wishes to provide first-hand accounts of storm aftermath or photos, I will be glad to publish them in this blog.)

On a brighter note, Gonu has been significantly downgraded from its former super cyclonic storm status. Furthermore, the Al Hajar mountain range will cause Gonu to rapidly lose intensity due to friction. The mountains represent a double-edged sword, however, for the lifting that will occur as northerly to northeasterly winds strike Al Hajar will result in torrential rains and flash flooding over a fairly wide area.


Very Severe Cyclonic Storm GONU
Very Severe Cyclonic Storm GONU, Infrared Image at 2300 UTC 5 June 2007,
just north of Ra's al-Hadd, possibly beginning a turn toward the north.
Photo courtesy Naval Research Lab (NRL)



The India Meteorological Department (RSMC New Delhi) Quasi-Lagrangian Model (QLM) has for the last two days forecast Gonu to come ashore just south of Ra's al-Hadd. The storm seemed headed directly for Ra's al-Hadd, but beginning with the 2200Z (UTC) 5 June 2007 infrared satellite image appears to be turning to a more northwesterly heading and remaining off the coast. This was perfectly in line with JTWC's projections right up until the most recent Warning 015, issued at 2100Z 5 June, at which time they significantly altered the Gonu ATCF track to pass directly over both Ra's al-Hadd and Muscat. In light of this significant alteration in forecast trajectory, it will be interesting to see whether the apparent northward turn continues.

Presently, Very Severe Cyclonic Storm Gonu has 80 kt (148 km/hr) maximum 10-minute sustained winds as estimated by RSMC New Delhi and 90 kt (167 km/hr) maximum 1-minute sustained winds as estimated by JTWC. Central pressure has risen at least 50 hPa from yesterday's estimated lows.

At its worst, Very Severe Cyclonic Storm Gonu was upgraded by RSMC New Delhi at 1700 UTC on 4 June 2007 to Super Cyclonic Storm Gonu (based on 1500 UTC data) and maintained central pressure of 920 hPa and maximum sustained 10-minute wind speed at 130 knots (241 km/hr) with gusts to 160 knots (296 km/hr) for six hours.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) at 1200 UTC on 4 June 2007 in Warning 010 indicated central pressure of Tropical Cyclone 02A (Gonu) at 898 millibars (hPa) and estimated maximum sustained 1-minute wind speed at 140 knots (259 km/hr) with gusts to 170 knots (315 km/hr), making it a Saffir-Simpson Category 5 storm (the highest rating on the Saffir-Simpson scale). This storm strength was maintained for six hours.

Check our Tropical Storm, Typhoon & Hurricane Tracking Center frequently for updates on Gonu.

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Posted by: The Spidermaster on Jun 05, 07 | 8:15 pm | Profile

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Mon Jun 04, 2007

Gonu Has Become a Super Cyclonic Storm

RSMC New Delhi at 1700 UTC on 4 June 2007 upgraded Very Severe Cyclonic Storm Gonu to Super Cyclonic Storm Gonu based on 1500 UTC data. This is the highest classification a tropical cyclone in the North Indian Ocean can achieve. RSMC New Delhi estimates central pressure at 920 hPa and maximum sustained 10-minute wind speed at 130 knots (241 km/hr) with gusts to 160 knots (296 km/hr).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) at 1200 UTC on 4 June 2007 in Warning 010 indicated central pressure of Tropical Cyclone 02A (Gonu) at 898 millibars (hPa) and estimated maximum sustained 1-minute wind speed at 140 knots (259 km/hr) with gusts to 170 knots (315 km/hr), making it a Saffir-Simpson Category 5 storm (the highest rating on the Saffir-Simpson scale). If Gonu were in the Western North Pacific Ocean, it would be classified by JTWC as a super typhoon.


Super Cyclonic Storm GONU
Super Cyclonic Storm GONU, Infrared Image at 1800 UTC 4 June 2007.
The Arabian Peninsula is to the left in the photo. Photo courtesy Naval Research Lab (NRL)



Super Cyclonic Storm Gonu is presently moving toward the west-northwest at about 10 knots (19 km/hr). It is expected to reach the Oman coast on 6 June.

Check our Tropical Storm, Typhoon & Hurricane Tracking Center frequently for updates on Gonu. If you are within this dangerous storm's expected path, begin emergency preparations immediately and stay tuned to your local civil defence, government or emergency broadcasts for latest critical information and advice.

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Posted by: The Spidermaster on Jun 04, 07 | 3:30 pm | Profile

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Very Severe Cyclonic Storm Gonu Approaches Oman

Very Severe Cyclonic Storm Gonu continues its trek toward Oman. The latest Joint Typhoon Warning Center warning for this storm (Warning 009, issued at 0900 UTC on 4 June 2007) shows the storm tracking overland just south of Muscat near midnight UTC on 7 June (4 AM local Muscat time on 7 June) with maximum sustained 1-minute wind speed near 60 knots or 111 km/hr (based on author's interpolation of Warning 009 graphic depiction). Gonu is expected to cross the extreme northeastern Oman coastline prior to 0600 UTC on 6 June with maximum sustained 1-minute winds near 75 knots (139 km/hr) and wind gusts to 90 knots (167 km/hr).


Very Severe Cyclonic Storm GONU
Very Severe Cyclonic Storm GONU, Infrared Image at 0800 UTC 4 June 2007.
The Arabian Peninsula is the dark area to the left in the photo.
Photo courtesy Naval Research Lab (NRL)



At 0600 UTC on 4 June the Joint Typhoon Warning Center estimated minimum pressure at the center of Very Severe Cyclonic Storm Gonu to be 910 millibars (hPa) with maximum 1-minute sustained wind speed of 130 knots (241 km/hr) and gusts to 160 knots (296 km/hr), making it a Saffir-Simpson Category 4 storm. (If Gonu were in the North Pacific Ocean, it would be classified as a super typhoon.) At 0900 UTC RSMC New Delhi (the India Meteorological Department, or IMD), in Advisory 17, pegged central pressure at 934 hPa (hectopascals) with maximum sustained 10-minute surface wind speed of between 115 and 125 knots (213 - 232 km/hr), but had not yet classified Gonu as a super cyclonic storm. The IMD did note, however, that further intensification could be expected. The JTWC, on the other hand, expects a slight weakening as the storm encounters slightly cooler waters.

Gonu is obviously a very formidable storm. Residents of and travelers to northeast Oman, especially those near the coast, need to begin taking precautions immediately. This tropical cyclone could prove deadly for those not adequately prepared, but will also be beneficial for the region. See newsBriefsOman by Sue Hutton to discover the benefit Gonu could bring as well as her article The floods of March 2007 for photos of what happens when the wadis (dry stream beds, similar to arroyos in the Southwestern U.S.) overflow.


Very Strong Cyclonic Storm GONU
Very Severe Cyclonic Storm GONU, Visible Image at 1300 UTC 4 June 2007.
This is a potentially deadly storm with sustained winds of 140 knots.
Photo courtesy Naval Research Lab (NRL)



I'll continue to track Gonu throughout its duration in our Tropical Storm, Typhoon & Hurricane Tracking Center so you'll be able to keep up-to-date on the progress of this very significant tropical cyclone.

UPDATE:  JTWC Warning 010 has just upgraded Gonu to Saffir-Simpson Category 5, the highest category tropical cyclone (by U.S. definition using maximum 1-minute sustained wind speed). Central pressure for this storm is now estimated at 898 millibars (hPa), or 26.52 inches of mercury, with maximum 1-minute sustained wind speed of 140 knots (259 km/hr). The new pressure estimate, if confirmed, may make Gonu the most intense tropical cyclone ever recorded in the North Indian Ocean or Arabian Sea.

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Posted by: The Spidermaster on Jun 04, 07 | 9:45 am | Profile

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Sun Jun 03, 2007

Very Severe Cyclonic Storm Gonu Threatens Oman

In yesterday morning's post I mentioned that Tropical Cyclone 02A in the Arabian Sea had just been named by RSMC New Delhi (a.k.a. the India Meteorological Department, or IMD) as Cyclonic Storm Gonu. Since then the storm has developed rapidly and was recently upgraded to Very Severe Cyclonic Storm Gonu, a Saffir-Simpson Category 4 storm as measured by Joint Typhoon Warning Center wind speed estimates. While Gonu wandered for much of the last 24 hours, it has recently assumed a more definite course which, if maintained, will bring it ashore on the northeast coast of Oman on the Arabian Peninsula. With JTWC estimating central pressure of 927 millibars (hPa) and maximum 1-minute sustained wind speed of 115 knots (213 km/hr), this is a formidable storm which continues to gain strength as it spins across the Arabian Sea.


Very Strong Cyclonic Storm GONU
Very Strong Cyclonic Storm GONU, Infrared Image at 0100 UTC 4 June 2007,
showing a sharply defined eye. The eastern Arabian Peninsula lies to the left.
Photo courtesy Naval Research Lab (NRL)



I wish to offer apology to the India Meteorological Department for my criticism yesterday regarding the lack of early international bulletins issued on this storm. In reality, the IMD was issuing bulletins from the time Gonu was an unnamed tropical depression. However, possibly due to a non-standard data transmission format, these bulletins are not being picked up and displayed on the World Meteorological Organization Severe Weather Information Centre website. Even now, with Gonu having reached a critical intensity level, it does not appear on the world map. While my criticism may have been misdirected, it was certainly not without merit. Both the IMD and the WMO should immediately take appropriate actions to resolve this issue.


Very Strong Cyclonic Storm GONU
Very Strong Cyclonic Storm GONU, Visible Image at 0230 UTC 4 June 2007,
showing the eye and an extensive cloud shield in the southwest quadrant of the storm.
Photo courtesy Naval Research Lab (NRL)



Keep yourself up to date on this and other tropical cyclones by visiting our Tropical Storm, Typhoon & Hurricane Tracking Center.

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Posted by: The Spidermaster on Jun 03, 07 | 11:45 pm | Profile

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Sat Jun 02, 2007

2007 Atlantic Hurricane Season Starts With a Bang

The 2007 Atlantic Hurricane Season officially began yesterday, June 1st, and an eventful day it was! Tropical Storm Barry was "discovered" in the Gulf of Mexico when a Hurricane Hunter aircraft was sent to investigate a tropical disturbance that had been under close scrutiny since it began blossoming on 30 May. It was a surprise when the Hunter encountered 60-knot winds at a flight level of 500 feet (Source: The Weather Channel). Florida residents, ordinarily fearful of tropical storms, have welcomed Barry as it brings beneficial rains to quench the fires that have been ravaging their state. The rain shield from this tropical storm is extensive, and represents a good start to replenishing Lake Ochechobee, whose water level has dropped by many feet under the influence of prolonged drought.

While the timing of Tropical Storm Barry was impecable, it was far from the only activity taking place in the tropics yesterday. Our neighbors to the south in Mexico and Guatemala have been keeping a close watch on Tropical Storm Barbara, which will soon be coming on shore near Puerto Madero in the Mexican state of Chiapas near the Guatemalan border. This tropical storm has been drifting off the southern coast of Mexico for days; originally expected to gain hurricane strength, it fortunately could not muster the upper level support needed to undergo significant intensification. Because of its slow movement, it could still dump significant rainfall on the region with resultant flooding.


Tropical Storm BARBARA, Eastern North Pacific Ocean
Tropical Storm BARBARA, Visible Image at 1415 UTC 2 June 2007,
preparing to come ashore near the Mexico-Guatemala border.
Photo courtesy Naval Research Lab (NRL)



The North Indian Ocean yesterday saw the birth of the second tropical cyclone of the season. Named this morning as Cyclonic Storm Gonu, this storm presently carries winds of 55 knots (102 km/hr) and is intensifying. Moving through the Arabian Sea, it poses a significant threat to land. While I do not like to criticize, I am baffled by the failure of RSMC New Delhi, the WMO (World Meteorological Organization) designated agency responsible for monitoring tropical weather systems in the North Indian Ocean, to issue a single international advisory on this storm prior to this morning. (A Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert was issued at 1030 UTC on 1 June by the U.S. Joint Typhoon Warning Center and Warning Number 001 for Tropical Cyclone 02A was issued by JTWC at 0300 UTC on 2 June.) Perhaps the Indian government, which is as a rule progressive regarding issues relating to technology, should devote some additional funding to their weather forecasting efforts.

Apart from keeping up with the storms, I spent a good portion of the day yesterday building new templates for our tropical storm monitoring center. I am pleased to say that I was successful; the end result is that I can now get information updated about four times faster than previously possible. While this is not especially significant when tracking a single storm, on days like yesterday when I was updating four tropical systems (Yes, Alvin is still alive, spinning out there in the Eastern North Pacific about 1,000 miles southwest of Lower Baja.) at once AND trying to get the regular work done as well, it becomes critical.

Keep yourself current on tropical cyclone information worldwide with our Tropical Storm, Typhoon & Hurricane Tracking Center. And, while I'm on the subject, please let me know if there is anything you would like to see added to the center. I will do my best to accommodate any reasonable request.

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Posted by: The Spidermaster on Jun 02, 07 | 11:00 am | Profile

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